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Andrew Strauss

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Country: England
Date of Birth: March 2, 2022
Place of Birth: Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
Batting Style: Left Handed
Bowling Style: Left-arm medium
Skill: Batsman
Teams Played: England


Batting Performance

MInnNoRunsHS100s50sAvgSR
Tests8915766340177 192541.9949.64
ODI12712684205158 62735.6480.99
T20s4407333 0018.25114.06
IPL------------------

Bowling & Fielding Performance

MOversRunsMdnsWktsAvgBestEcon
Tests----------------
ODI127130030/33
T20s----------------
IPL----------------

Career Performance

First MatchLast Match
TestsMay 20, 2022 v New Zealand at Lord's, LondonAugust 18, 2021 v India at The Oval, London
ODIsNovember 18, 2021 v Sri Lanka at Rangiri Dambulla International Stadium, RangiriMarch 26, 2022 v Sri Lanka at R.Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
T20sJune 13, 2021 v Australia at The Rose Bowl, SouthamptonMarch 15, 2022 v West Indies at Queen's Park Oval, Port of Spain, Trinidad
IPL----

Profile

Andrew Strauss is another England opener in the list to score a Test ton on debut. He made an immediate impact on international cricket with some scintillating knocks as an opener. Not too many players bag the Man of the Match award in their debut match but this southpaw pocketed the honour in his maiden Test against New Zealand, after scoring match-winning knocks of 112 and 83 at Lords. A fluid left-handed batsman, Strauss is more of an accumulator of runs rather than a dasher like the former English player Graham Thorpe. Being a sweet timer of the ball, the southpaw is an excellent driver of the cricket ball. The South African-born Englishman is also an excellent slip fielder. Due to his poor run in 2007, Strauss was temporarily dropped from the national side but earned a quick recall for the 2008 New Zealand tour where he proved his mettle in the series-deciding Test at Napier. The Middlesex opener played a career-saving knock of 177 runs and followed that up with another century to help his nation clinch the Test series against the Kiwis. The South African pacemen exposed his weakness in the following series as he notched up just one half-century when the Proteas won the series in England. He was lucky to retain his place for the tour of India but immediately got back to his willow-yielding ways in the first Test at Chennai when he struck centuries in both innings of the Test, becoming only the tenth Englishman to do so. In January 2009, he succeeded Kevin Pietersen as the skipper of England post a tough time for England cricket, where someone strong was needed at the helm. He lost his first series as skipper 1-0 to West Indies but made up for that by drubbing the same side 2-0 on the return tour. He then led the team in the ODI series between the same sides, making a return to the 50-over format after a gap of two years. He, however, excluded himself from the shortest format as Paul Collingwood took over the reins for the ICC World Twenty20 in June 2009. His next task was the high-profile Ashes series against Australia, where his 193 (161 and 32) in the second Test helped England take a 1-0 lead over the visitors.