CRICKET PEOPLE

The face and voice of cricket...

In a career spanning two decades, Harsha Bhogle has emerged as the broadcaster every wants to be

Monday, January 14, 2022



Harsha Bhogle


Sportz Interactive

For nearly two decades now, his pleasing face has greeted us whenever a cricket broadcast has brought home Test and ODI action from all over the world.

No wonder, rightly Hyderabad-born Harsha Bhogle has emerged as the face of cricket broadcasting in the country.

In the early '90s when the cable television revolution began to trigger waves around the nation, broadcasters received more of a free hand in calling on live international cricket. Bhogle, without a shadow of a doubt, played a big role in raising the profile of the game in the country.

A hardworking student at college, Bhogle studied Chemical Engineering, and bowled off-spin. Bhogle went on to attend a premier institute, the Indian Institute of Management (IIM). But all through Bhogle remained a close and passionate follower of his hometown hero and former India captain Mohd Azharuddin.

Years later Bhogle went on to write 'Azhar — the Authorised Biography of Mohammad Azharuddin' and also authored several other books on Indian cricket.

Apart from being a reputed commentator, Bhogle remains a journalist at heart, who has travelled the world and covered over 50 Tests and 300 One-Day Internationals. He is also known to be someone who is also involved in cricket shows, quizzes, live cricket and more.

The charismatic Bhogle began his career at the tender age of 19 with All India Radio, after which he went on to work for Australian Broadcasting Corporation for a number of years. Apart from extensive work with BBC and ESPN Star, Bhogle has articulated his love for the game through television, radio, newspaper columns, books and even the internet.

Bhogle emerged as the face of ESPN when it was launched in the mid 90s. Bhogle recently won the Indian Television Academy Award for the best sports presenter/commentator.

A recipient of extensive accolades for his work, the Gentleman magazine voted him as one of '50 men you want to know better'. In addition, Outlook nominated him as one of eight people who 'have changed the way their profession is perceived'.

Bhogle has also worked extensively towards the development of social health organisations along with his wife Anita. Bhogle has received admiration from broadcasters, players, fans, officials and everyone involved in the cricketing fraternity.

It is therefore just right that Bhogle is the person every aspiring broadcaster in India wants to emulate.
 


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